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Peter by rageofreason Peter by rageofreason
Airbrush portrait on canvas of a friend who passed away to higher realms too soon. View more of my analog art at: [link]
:iconrageofreason:
rageofreason Featured By Owner Jul 13, 2008
Thin lines in airbrushing are done by working with very low airpressure (just enough to drive the mixture out), working very close to the surface (almost touching it with the needle tip. Some airbrushes like the Iwata's allow you to remove the air cap, which bares the needle tip; remove it to come closer to the surface. Finally use very diluted paints (mix ratios: 1 : 10 or higher). I never start spraying immediately on the surface, but always test it on a small piece of paper that I hold between the airbrush that is already close to the surface. I fiddle with the trigger to find the proper consistency of the spray and after it is stabilized I quickly remove the paper and move the brush closer to the surface yet and start spraying on the surface. This may sound complicated, but it will become second nature soon and all this takes place in a few seconds only. Work in layers, which allows you to apply all subtleties required.

Applying thin lines in a single pass is done by moving the airbrush over the surface fast with higher air pressure and less diluted paint. This technique is often used to spray hair. It requires good trigger control in order to not let the lines begin and end abruptly and a steady hand. Hope this helps.
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:iconfooboochu:
fooboochu Featured By Owner Jul 12, 2008
This is a great piece. How do you get those thin to thick lines in the eye lids?
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Details

Submitted on
July 12, 2008
Image Size
760 KB
Resolution
657×800
Link
Thumb

Stats

Views
203
Favourites
1 (who?)
Comments
2
Downloads
3

Camera Data

Make
KONICA MINOLTA
Model
DiMAGE Z10
Shutter Speed
10/400 second
Aperture
F/3.2
Focal Length
6 mm
ISO Speed
125
Date Taken
Jan 1, 2004, 12:00:00 AM

License

Creative Commons License
Some rights reserved. This work is licensed under a
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.
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